5 Reasons to Love Trentino, Italy - Family Traveller (USA)

Hold on to your beanies! There’s more than just top-quality skiing in this beautiful Italian winter resort. Sweeping up from the northern end of Lake Garda, Trentino is one of Italy’s best ski regions. The greatness is in the 450 miles of downhill runs, the cross-country trails covering upwards of 280 miles, and a long, snow-sure season, helped out by 3,000 snow cannons covering 80 percent of slopes. 

But there’s more to a family ski holiday than skiing, and few places understand that better than multifaceted Trentino. So for those members of the family who don’t (or won't) ski, or who just want to mix up the skiing with other fun activities, here are the top five snow-centric family activities.

Catch some thrills with sledding

Whether your kids are old enough to have forgotten how much fun sledding is, or have not yet had the chance to try it, Trentino has something for them this winter. 

• Nighthawks will love sledding the 1.5-mile floodlit trails at Laner-Obereggen in Val Di Fiemme.

• High above Predazzo, the region’s first ever Alpine coaster is for riders who don’t think mere sleds are fast enough. 

• Val di Fassa has a great mix of tubing and sledding for all ages, from fun mini-trails to white-knuckle runs for teens.

• Alpe Cimbra offers the ultimate in Trentino sledding, with state-of-the-art sledge lifts to whisk you to the top of the run. 

Make memories on a dogsled ride

Dogsledding is an unforgettable family experience. You can snuggle up with the kids and let someone else take the reins, or learn to be a musher and handle the magnificent Huskies for yourself. For full-on magic, try a moonlit sled ride. 

• Windshot at Passo Coe in Alpe Cimbra offers 15-minute sled rides for ages 3–6, and junior-musher experiences for ages 8–14.

• Husky and Scuola Italiana Sleddog at Val di Sole in Passo del Tonale, home to more than 70 huskies, has a range of sled tours.

• Athabaska Dogsledding near Madonna di Campiglio starts with 2.5-mile taster sled rides and goes right through to four-day training courses. This is also the center for dogsledding after dark. 

Discover the magic of night-skiing

There’s a long tradition of night-skiing in this part of Italy, so expect to be spoiled with the options: envision floodlit skiing and glimmering slopes. It’s the stuff of fairytales.

• Madonna di Campiglio was the first Trentino resort to introduce night-skiing on its exciting 3-Tre Piste, and it’s still one of the best.

• The Pinzolo-Carisolo Center in Val Rendena offers floodlit cross-country skiing.

• At Passo Brocon in Valsugana, young night owls can ski on illuminated nursery slopes.

• Colverde Snowpark lights up for freestylers.

• Forty Sunglobes turn San Martino di Castrozza's slopes into a winter wonderland. 

Hit the trails on fat bikes

Trentino has championed low-pressure tires and beaten trails for years. You’ll find everything here from great bikes to advice on the best techniques.

• Follow expert local guides in the Alpe Cimbra on Folgaria-Lavarone's excellent beaten trails.

• Try guided tours in the Dolomiti Paganella Bike Area, on Monte Bondone, or across the Brentonico Plateau. 

• Enter the La Winter Downhill Race on the Biancaneve Piste in Cogolo di Pejo. It’s the ride of a lifetime – but not for the fainthearted. 

Step into snowshoes for a family adventure

Trekking over snow may make kids feel like intrepid explorers, but today’s hi-tech snowshoes are easy to master and there are well-marked trails across the region. Tailor your tour to the ability of the smallest family member.

• Great local cooking at mountain huts will reward your efforts en route. Try Rifugio Fuciade, at the end of the 2.5-mile trail above Passo San Pellegrino; Capanna Cervino under the Pale di San Martino massif; or Malga Ritorto near Madonna di Campiglio.

Find more family ski resources here.